Sexual Health Q&A

How soon can couples have sex again after a miscarriage?

Sex after miscarriage depends on the individual. A woman’s doctor can give the best guidance on her personal situation.

Generally, couples can resume sex when they feel ready, but this time frame will vary from couple to couple. There are physical and emotional factors to consider.

On the physical side, many doctors suggest waiting to have sex until the bleeding from the miscarriage has stopped and the woman has had at least one normal menstrual period. Others recommend that couples wait six weeks or more, especially if the pregnancy was longer or if there were complications during miscarriage.

After miscarriage, the uterus and cervix stay partially dilated, which makes these organs more prone to infection until they completely heal. To reduce this risk, women are usually advised not to insert anything into the vagina, such as tampons, for two weeks. It also means that couples should wait this long before having vaginal intercourse.

Some women may need to wait until all of the pregnancy/fetal tissue has been removed. This tissue may pass on its own within a few weeks. A doctor may prescribe medication to help the process along. Surgical removal (using D&C) is another option.

It’s a good idea for a woman to have a thorough pelvic exam before having sex again. Couples should use birth control if they do not want another pregnancy so soon.

Emotionally, it takes time to process a miscarriage. It’s normal for couples to grieve afterward. Depression, fatigue, and anxiety may interfere with sexual desire and arousal. Partner’s understanding support is essential during this time. Keeping the lines of communication open and being honest about any fears or concerns is important.

Couples shouldn’t hesitate to seek counseling if needed. Healthcare providers can make referrals to therapists who specialize in coping with such a loss.