Sexual Health Q&A

Can medication help men who have problems with ejaculation and orgasm?

It’s possible, but more research on this question is needed.

Anorgasmia refers to a problem reaching orgasm. Men with anorgasmia may have delayed orgasm or no orgasm at all. Finding a treatment for anorgasmia has been a challenge.

In February 2013, BJU International published a report by researchers from NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center, who examined 17 studies of men with erectile dysfunction (ED) and their experiences with the drug tadalafil, commonly marketed under the brand name Cialis.

Tadalafil, a phosphodiesterase type-5 inhibitor or PDE5i, is currently approved for the treatment of ED and the signs and symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH – an enlarged prostate). Men with both conditions may also take tadalafil.

The studies involved over 3,500 men with varying degrees of ED. The researchers noted that many men with ED have problems with ejaculation and orgasm, leading to lower sexual satisfaction.

The researchers found that about two thirds of the men who took tadalafil saw improvements in their ability to ejaculate and reach orgasm. This result occurred no matter how severe their erectile dysfunction.

Eli Lilly & Company, which manufactures Cialis, funded the study.

While this news seems encouraging, it is important to note that these studies only involved men who had erectile dysfunction. Tadalafil has not been tested for treatment of ejaculatory and orgasmic disorders in men without ED.

Also, because the study looked only at tadalafil, it is unclear whether other types of PDE5is [such as sildenafil (Viagra) or vardenafil (Levitra)] would help men with ejaculation and orgasm problems, regardless of ED.

If a man has problems ejaculating or reaching orgasm, he should speak to his doctor.