Exercise Might Alleviate Premature Ejaculation

Men with premature ejaculation (PE) may benefit from more physical activity, Finnish researchers say. However, more study is needed before clinicians can recommend more exercise as a treatment approach.

Premature ejaculation is defined by the International Society for Sexual Medicine (ISSM) in several ways: Lifelong PE occurs when a man ejaculates within a minute of penetration and has done so since his first sexual experience. Men with acquired PE had periods of normal ejaculation before, but now climax within about three minutes. Additional subtypes are also described for men with longer or variable times to ejaculation.

Men with PE find they cannot delay ejaculation and may feel a great deal of stress and frustration. Unfortunately, the exact causes of PE are still unknown.

Lifestyle factors, such as alcohol consumption, body mass index (BMI), and exercise are thought to affect sexual function. With this connection in mind, the researchers decided to investigate these three factors and their possible role with PE.

Data were collected from two samples of Finnish men. The first group (average age 33 years), consisted of 863 men who participated in a previous population-based survey. The second group, referred to as the clinical sample, included 69 men with lifelong PE. Their average age was 44 years.

Using an online questionnaire, the men provided information on their experiences with PE, erectile dysfunction, alcohol use, and exercise habits during their free time.

The researchers found that when men exercised less, they were more likely to have PE symptoms. The link between alcohol use and PE was negligible, they noted. And no association was found between PE and BMI.

If further research finds that physical activity reduces PE symptoms, clinicians might consider recommending exercise to men with PE, the scientists noted, adding that increased exercise could have a “snowball effect” and lead to improvements in body image, self-esteem, and overall health.

However, the researchers acknowledged that the men answered questions about exercise in their free time only. It was unknown how much men with physically demanding jobs exercised as part of their everyday work.

Erectile dysfunction was not associated with any of the lifestyle factors studied. However, this result might have occurred because the average age of the population-based sample was 33. Generally, men start to experience erectile problems in middle age, so ED would not be so common in this group.

The study was published online in August in the Journal of Sexual Medicine.

Resources

The Journal of Sexual Medicine

Ventus, Daniel, BA and Patrick Jern, PhD
“Lifestyle Factors and Premature Ejaculation: Are Physical Exercise, Alcohol Consumption, and Body Mass Index Associated With Premature Ejaculation and Comorbid Erectile Problems?”
(Full-text. Published online: August 30, 2016)
http://www.jsm.jsexmed.org/article/S1743-6095(16)30372-1/abstract